Have upon thee, kittens and equality!
landscapelifescape:

Colorado Rockies, Denver, Colorado, USA
Sunrise Over The Front Range by kkart

landscapelifescape:

Colorado Rockies, Denver, Colorado, USA

Sunrise Over The Front Range by kkart

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:


biyuti:


girljanitor:


dumbthingswhitepplsay:


popca:


dolgematki:


nativevoice:


“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 
IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.
A case of ginger ale: $82.
Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.
Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/inuit-food-prices-protest-120608/#ixzz1xKWAJkGe


Holy hell.


WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.


ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross
64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.
Conservationists
have been starving
these people
to death for years.


Reblogging for the extra articles. 
Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 


Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.


This is really fucking important.
This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.
It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.
The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.
Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.
There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:

biyuti:

girljanitor:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

popca:

dolgematki:

nativevoice:

“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 

IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.

A case of ginger ale: $82.

Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.

Holy hell.

WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.

ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross

64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.

Conservationists

have been starving

these people

to death for years.

Reblogging for the extra articles. 

Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 

Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.

This is really fucking important.

This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.

It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.

The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.

  • Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
  • If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
  • Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
  • Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
  • For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
  • Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
  • For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
  • Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.

There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

thevoxbox:

theconcealedweapon:

Abled people complain about disabled people needing accommodations, because “in the real world there are no accommodations”.

But abled people receive accommodations all the time. Cars are an accommodation for those who can’t run a steady speed of 60 mph. Stairs are an accommodation for those who can’t jump from one story to the next. Phones are an accommodation for those who can’t communicate telepathically. Calculators are an accommodation for those who can’t do large math problems in their head. Lights are an accommodation for those who can’t see in the dark. Stoves are an accommodation for those who can’t heat things with their eyes. Clocks are an accommodation for those who can’t tell what time it is just by the position of the sun. Jackets are an accommodation for those who are susceptible to frostbite when it’s cold. 

Abled people receive accommodations all the time, but since it’s considered socially acceptable to need those accommodations, they’re not considered accommodations. But imagine if you lived in a world where you needed those accommodations but most people didn’t. That’s what it feels like to be disabled.

This is an incredibly important post. As one of my favourite professors said, “Technology is not innocent." As in, all technology had to be designed by a human being. And chances are, if that human being had any biases or assumptions that could be translated into the technology they created, they probably wound up in there. Practically everything is designed specifically for abled people. Think about cars, for example. Could you drive a car one-handed? Well, yeah, very likely, but since most people have two hands, they designed the cars to use both hands. Two hands to grip the steering wheel, buttons and levers on both sides of said wheel, etc. There is nothing that says cars are better when you design them for one specific degree of physical wellness, but yet that is exactly how they’re designed.  This extends to virtually everything human-made you see. I do mean everything.

So for the love of heaven, please don’t whine and complain when you see disabled people of any variety getting “special accommodations.” All technological design is purposeful. Every piece of technology you see was designed to accommodate someone. If you’re lucky enough to be accommodated by something’s most common design, don’t be an ass to people who would be better served by an alternate version.

rainbow-dirt:

xlovexisxblindx:

nodudedontdothat:

4gifs:

Puppy enjoys listening to guitar

I CANT DEAL WITH THIS AMOUNT OF ADORABLE 

Omfg

Mine howled at my guitar, he didn’t like it… maybe I was bad :P

rainbow-dirt:

xlovexisxblindx:

nodudedontdothat:

4gifs:

Puppy enjoys listening to guitar

I CANT DEAL WITH THIS AMOUNT OF ADORABLE 

Omfg

Mine howled at my guitar, he didn’t like it… maybe I was bad :P

While shopping the other day I saw a guy…

… wearing a shirt that said “I swear, officer, she was awake”. … Way to broadcast to the world at large that you’re a gigantic shithead at best and a creep at worst. Some people…

iwanttoberecycled:

I want to be less compact, less disc. 

followthewestwind:

(via 500px / Mordor by Ole Henrik Skjelstad)

Bayt Al-Suhaymi, Cairo, Egypt

Bayt Al-Suhaymi, Cairo, Egypt

It’s always a good idea to write back to workplaces and ask why you didn’t get the job. The feedback is normally useful, or at least it can make you feel less bad if it’s a stupid reason!

Ah, guess I could try that. Thanks!